University of Queensland Pilot Testing Study

50% More Effective Than Walking For The Same Amount Of Time!

University of Queensland Test

50% More Effective Than Walking For The Same Amount Of Time!

 

The University Of Queensland
School of Human Movement Studies

 

Project Description:
Boomerang GYM – Pilot Testing Studies

 

PURPOSE

Increasing daily energy expenditure is important in the control of body composition and body fatness. Ultimately, body fatness is associated with disease states including cardiovascular disease and, therefore increasing energy expenditure has the potential to improve health and longevity.

Walking exercise is currently a popular form of exercise that contributes to daily energy expenditure. However, various forms of exercise can burn more energy than walking (per unit time) and therefore, could help individuals control their weight more effectively and lose excess fat faster. Furthermore, walking exercise may not be appropriate for all persons (elderly, obese populations), and other forms of exercise that can be performed indoors, in controlled environments, have these benefits.

Therefore, the use of the Boomerang Gym could be a viable method for increasing energy expenditure in persons who would like an alternative to walking exercise in their physical exercise routine.

METHODS

Eight subjects (4 male, 4 female) were tested over a 16-minute interval exercising with either the Boomerang Gym or walking on a treadmill at four kilometers per hour. Subjects completed a Perception of Mood States questionnaire before testing and after walking and boomerang exercise. During exercise, the concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in their exhaled breath was measured continuously with the aid of a Morgan Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide analyzers during the exercise periods.

Heart rate was monitored continuously and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) was measured at four periods during each exercise condition. The order of exercise participation (boomerang gym, walking) was counterbalanced and a minimum of thirty minutes rest was provided between each exercise trial.

Energy expenditure was estimated by using indirect calorimetry including the calculation of total oxygen consumption and respiratory exchange ratios.

RESULTS

University of Qld graph

Characteristic Mean ± SD

Height (cm)     170                 9
Weight (kg)       80                21
Age (yr)             45                17 
BMI (kg/m2)       28                 7
SBP (mmHg)    127                 6
DPB (mmHg)      93                 7
RHR (bpm)         78                12


The graph above shows the oxygen consumption during the Boomerang GYM exercise (the pink dots) and walking at 4 k/ph. The Boomerang GYM exercise appeared to increase oxygen consumption incrementally as the protocol moved through its four stages.

The average energy expenditure per minute was also significantly higher in the Boomerang GYM exercise (6.75=2.29 vs 4.52=1.42 Kcal/min (p<0.05. As such, total energy expenditure in the 16-minute Boomerang GYM protocol was approximately 50% higher to that in walking (72.4=21.18 Kcal vs 108.02 = 28.89, p<0.05)

FINDINGS

graph_expenditure01

Figure 1 shows the average energy expenditure per minute during the Boomerang GYM exercise and walking.

graph_expenditure02

Figure 2 shows the total energy expenditure during the 16-minute Boomerang GYM exercise and walking.

The results of the University tests indicate that Boomerang GYM exercise protocol results in greater oxygen consumption when compared to walking at four kilometers per hour.

As a consequence, the total energy expenditure in the 16-minute Boomerang GYM exercise protocol was approximately 50 % greater to that during the walking exercise over the same period of time. Based on these results subjects would have to walk at 4 km per hour for 24 minutes to burn the same number of kilocalories as in the Boomerang GYM exercise protocol.

Based on these findings the Boomerang GYM protocol could be an efficacious exercise regime for persons who cannot, or do not wish to use walking in their exercise regime.

Examples of these persons may include obese and elderly persons who may not exercise outside and perhaps persons with peripheral arterial disease who in some instances cannot walk without assistance.

The University Of Queensland
School of Human Movement Studies
Project Description: Boomerang GYM
Pilot Testing Studies

PURPOSE:
Increasing daily energy expenditure is important in the control of body composition and body fatness. Ultimately, body fatness is associated with disease states including cardiovascular disease and, therefore increasing energy expenditure has the potential to improve health and longevity.

Walking exercise is currently a popular form of exercise that contributes to daily energy expenditure. However, various forms of exercise can burn more energy than walking (per unit time) and therefore, could help individuals control their weight more effectively and lose excess fat faster. Furthermore, walking exercise may not be appropriate for all persons (elderly, obese populations), and other forms of exercise that can be performed indoors, in controlled environments, have these benefits.

Therefore, the use of the Boomerang Gym could be a viable method for increasing energy expenditure in persons who would like an alternative to walking exercise in their physical exercise routine.

METHODS:
Eight subjects (4 male, 4 female) were tested over a 16-minute interval exercising with either the Boomerang Gym or walking on a treadmill at four kilometers per hour. Subjects completed a Perception of Mood States questionnaire before testing and after walking and boomerang exercise. During exercise, the concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in their exhaled breath was measured continuously with the aid of a Morgan Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide analyzers during the exercise periods.

Heart rate was monitored continuously and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) was measured at four periods during each exercise condition. The order of exercise participation (boomerang gym, walking) was counterbalanced and a minimum of thirty minutes rest was provided between each exercise trial.

Energy expenditure was estimated by using indirect calorimetry including the calculation of total oxygen consumption and respiratory exchange ratios.

RESULTS:University of Qld graph

Characteristic Mean ± SD

Height (cm)     170                 9
Weight (kg)       80                21
Age (yr)             45                17 
BMI (kg/m2)       28                 7
SBP (mmHg)    127                 6
DPB (mmHg)      93                 7
RHR (bpm)         78                12

The graph above shows the oxygen consumption during the Boomerang GYM exercise (the pink dots) and walking at 4 k/ph. The Boomerang GYM exercise appeared to increase oxygen consumption incrementally as the protocol moved through its four stages.

The average energy expenditure per minute was also significantly higher in the Boomerang GYM exercise (6.75=2.29 vs 4.52=1.42 Kcal/min (p<0.05. As such, total energy expenditure in the 16-minute Boomerang GYM protocol was approximately 50% higher to that in walking (72.4=21.18 Kcal vs 108.02 = 28.89, p<0.05)

FINDINGS:graph_expenditure01

Figure 1 shows the average energy expenditure per minute during the Boomerang GYM exercise and walking.

graph_expenditure02Figure 2 shows the total energy expenditure during the 16-minute Boomerang GYM exercise and walking.

The results of the University tests indicate that Boomerang GYM exercise protocol results in greater oxygen consumption when compared to walking at four kilometers per hour.
As a consequence, the total energy expenditure in the 16-minute Boomerang GYM exercise protocol was approximately 50 % greater to that during the walking exercise over the same period of time. Based on these results subjects would have to walk at 4 km per hour for 24 minutes to burn the same number of kilocalories as in the Boomerang GYM exercise protocol.

Based on these findings the Boomerang GYM protocol could be an efficacious exercise regime for persons who cannot, or do not wish to use walking in their exercise regime.

Examples of these persons may include obese and elderly persons who may not exercise outside and perhaps persons with peripheral arterial disease who in some instances cannot walk without assistance.